Going the Growler – Borenore Brewhouse

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If you haven’t noticed, I love beer.

Living in a primarily wine growing region though, until recently any locally made craft brews that I could sample were created in 25 litre batches in my laundry.

Thankfully now all that is changing. 1859 Brewery, Badlands Brewery and the newest kid on the block, Borenore Brewhouse, are all adding, in their own special ways, to the craft brewing scene in Orange.

Each of these breweries are creating different styles of beer and it’s the latter, and the latest, Borenore Brewhouse, that is taking beer in a whole new, for Orange at least, direction.

Enter, the growler.

The growler, which is defined by Wikipedia asA growler (/ˈɡrlər/) is a glass or ceramic jug used to transport draft beer in Australia, the United States and Canada. They are commonly sold at breweries and brewpubs as a means to sell take-out craft beer.’

The problem with growlers, in the description above anyway, is that they break. Sure they look really cool in a hipstamatic, retro, paisley-shirted, bearded kind of way, but one drunken knock off the table and shazzam, one deposit lost.

Marty Oliver is the chief, cook and bottle wash behind the Borenore Brewhouse. Located in a converted shed behind the Borenore store, Marty is crafting a Pale Ale that has already made its way onto the beer lists of establishments like Aria Restaurant in Sydney.

P1020313sThanks to the growler though, we can now all enjoy the Borenore Pale Ale at home. If you’re into recycling, and we don’t mean chucking your stubbies into the yellow bin, you’ll love Borenore Brewhouse’s stainless steel growler.

“I have chosen to use stainless steel growlers because they wont smash if they’re rolling around the floor of the ute,” Marty said, “Plus our swing-top closures don’t wear down and leak like the screw on tin ones tend to do.”

Pressure rated and refillable up to twenty times, the growler is a unique experience. The Grolsch like swing cap keeps your brew intact and once opened, and considering you don’t down the two litres in one go, will keep the bubbles coming for up to three days.

“If you would normally enjoy a six pack of craft beer over a weekend, at a party or just with friends in one night like going out to a BYO like ProVista Wood fired pizza, then the growler is a great option, the insulated sides keep the beer cool for hours and is a great way to share a meal,” Marty said.

Most excited I was to hear that Marty will be producing seasonal beers and is also serving the freshest beer around.

“My commitment is to regularly fill growlers with whatever seasonal beer is freshly finished directly from our brewery tanks, often the day before the farmers markets or delivery to our Borenore Brewhouse Growler Club members,” he said.

That’s the big difference between Marty’s growlers and other craft beers, the freshness.

“We won’t be stockpiling filled growlers as tends to happen with the usual machine-filled runs of bottles, or even have a six week wait for bottle conditioned beer, the growlers will be the freshest you can get,” he said. “It should be as tasty and as fresh as our kegs now on-tap at the Metropolitan, but you’ll have to supply your own pool tables, balcony and food!”

If you’re interested in going the growler you can contact Marty directly on 0431 071 424 or call in at the brewery at the back of the Borenore store. The Agrestic Grocer also stocks a few growlers and you can grab some at the Orange Region Farmers Markets.

Category: Drink

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Article by: Mark Logan

Former photojournalist at the CWD, Mark Logan has mixed together his love of technology with his years of experience as a journalist and photographer to develop the Orange Post. The Orange Post is his baby. A baby whose gestation involved countless ideas, numerous bouts of indecision, an infinite number of hours cursing free software and more than one bottle of wine. Whilst he's not trying to cajole people into writing for the Orange Post, he's attempting to sharpen his vegetable gardening skills. He lives in a strangely shaped house in Millthorpe, loves ignoring recipe directions, dabbles in web design for fun, frustration and profit and is constantly in a battle of the wills with his dog Fergus